Top Healthcare Myths Debunked

Whenever people discuss about healthcare, certain misconceptions may pop up. Here are some of the most common myths debunked that surround the healthcare industry.

Myth1: Doctors are not well-paid

It is not true as in most of the economies and family doctor singapore are paid well . There are some people who are of the viewpoint that the pay of the physicians are quite low as compared to the length and expenses of their medical education as well the demands and pressures in their work. While it could be true in a few utopian societies where work ethics and education nearly correlate with compensation, in most countries it is not true. In fact, given the current trend, the annual salaries of doctors are further expected to rise so you need to plan accordingly,

Myth 2: Technology can act as a savior for healthcare

Some of the sophisticated gadgets and software used in the healthcare industry include CPOEs. EMRs, portable ultrasound machines, monitors for blood pressure, cloud-based glucose monitors, calorie counters, digital pedometers, surgical robots and Google Glass. There is no doubt about the immense potential of all the above-mentioned technologies. However, you should not forget that technology is simply a tool. Similar to any other tool, their effectiveness depend to a large extent on the hands that control them, or the brains that ascertain whether their application is really appropriate in a particular scenario or not. While very few people rill disagree that good technology helps. It is equally true that only honest intentions, sound judgment and good people can help in improving a healthcare system.

Myth 3: It is an ethical responsibility of all employers to offer health benefits to the workers they employ

The assumption or the view that employers have the most important part to play in direct financing of the healthcare costs of their employees is a flawed one. The reason for this is that soon a day will come when it will be tough to predict the healthcare costs with certainty. You must note that the costs pertaining to healthcare rise at a higher rate as compared to the inflation rate in an economy. When health benefits for employees constitute of ax significant chunk of workers compensation, real wages may continue to decline or stagnate. Now, this is a bit ironical since the income of an employee is a more powerful determinant of health as compared to a health insurance policy. As such, there are times when the benefits provided by some employers may not be that ethical. Thus, it is important that rich employers are restrained from providing sometimes only a little higher than big deductibles borne by the employees and then the employers terming them as compensation. To put it simply, cash is the real king particularly when it is about your health.

Myth 4: Healthcare expenses are more today since higher quality means higher expenses

This can be true in certain scenarios though not always. Have you ever thought why healthcare costs appear costly to you? But contrary to several misconceptions and bias, when it is about genuine health, it can be afforded by almost all since it is inexpensive. The reason for this is that you have decided taking control of your health Once you start doing that, you need not go through layers of profits, revenues and expenses. You rill bed stunned to see the cost savings you made since you are healthy.

Myth 5: It takes several years of training as well as education to cope up with health issues

It was true until technology and Internet changed everything and managed to break all the rules. While previously one had to go through several pages of a thick Encycledia to find out what they were looking for, acquiring information about healthcare through the net has become much easier and faster.

Hezbollah Spies via Facebook

In an excellent article in The Washington Times, UPI’s Shaun Waterman described a “red team” activity in which a security consultant created a false persona on Facebook that appeared to be attractive young woman who was working in cyber defense. She quickly garnered hundreds of friends in the national security community, as well as job offers and invites to conferences. In the process she gathered a great deal of sensitive materials such as inadvertently exposed passwords.

This is not a hypothetical concern – Hezbollah (long a terrorism pioneer) has already employed this strategy. According to the Israeli news site MySay:

The Hizbullah agent pretended she was an Israeli girl named “Reut Zukerman”, “Reut” succeeded during several weeks to engage more then 200 reserve and active personnel.

The Hizbullah agent gained the trust of soldiers and officers that didn’t hesitate to confirm him as a “friend” once they saw he/she is friends with several of their friends from the same unit. Most of them assumed that “Reut” was just another person who served in that elite intelligence unit.

In this way, Hizbullah collected information about the unit’s activity, names and personal details of its personnel, the unit’s slang, and visual information on its bases. This user / agent using Facebook is an example of a trend called fakebook.

The picture attached to “Reut Zukerman” was, of course, an appealing young woman (some tricks are timeless.)

Implications

The first concern regarding incidents of this nature is the raw intelligence collected. But more than the data, it creates opportunities to gather even more data.

Palestine And The Arab Reform Movement

While the Palestinians are united by their desire to destroy Israel and drive all Jews from the Middle East, they are divided by religion. Although most (except for three percent who are Christians) are Moslem, they are at odds over what kind of Islam should be practiced. Many, if not most, Palestinians in Gaza (where 1.5 million live) favor Islamic conservatism, and making religion the center of people’s lives and forcing all Palestinians to comply with Islamic law (Sharia). But in the West Bank (where 2.5 million live), the trend is definitely in favor of education (always popular among Palestinians) and moving away from destructive practices (religious conservatism and Islamic terrorism). This is actually still a contentious issue in the West Bank, where the ruling Fatah party has long been known for corruption more than any kind of reform. But the Prime Minister of the Palestinian Authority (a Fatah man) has been talking up more education, and critical thinking (something that could get you killed in Iran).

Some Arab leaders go even further. Three years ago, at a meeting of the Arab League, the king of Saudi Arabia told the assembled rulers that the biggest problem in the Arab world was poor leadership. This was a bold statement, but not unusual for the senior people in the Saudi government. These princes have also been supporting the Arab Reform Movement, which is based on the idea that most of the Arab world’s problems are internal, not the result of outside interference. Actually, most educated Arabs will readily admit that their leaders have been less than stellar, and largely responsible for the corruption and bad decisions that have put the Arab world so far behind the West, and every other region, except Africa, when it comes to economic growth.

But knowing and admitting to the problem does not solve it. The United States found that out after Saddam Hussein’s Baath Party dictatorship was overthrown. Iraqis eagerly embraced democracy, only to find that the people they elected, were not a big improvement over Saddam. Some of Iraq’s new leaders backed terrorists. This was especially true of Iran backed Shia factions, which unleashed death squads, that killed thousands of Sunni Arabs, four years ago. Some of the Sunni Arab leaders supported terrorists who targeted Shias. And then there was the corruption, with billions of dollars of government money missing.

This incompetence is also, as the Saudi king likes to point out, the cause of the Islamic terrorism that is growing in the Islamic world. Indeed, these terrorists only began attacking kafirs (non-Moslems) in the 1990s when they realized Islamic terrorists were getting shut down in Arab countries. In Egypt, Syria and Algeria, Islamic radical attempts to toss out corrupt governments all failed. While Arab leadership may suck, these guys have certainly mastered the art of running a police state.

But attacking non-Moslems, outside of the Moslem world, brought into play the Western media. This was important, because the Western media now had 24 hour, world-wide (via satellite) outlets. All the people that mattered could now see what the Islamic terrorists did. Before, terror attacks inside Arab countries were largely ignored by the rest of the world. The publicity was important, because there were millions of Arabs living in the West. These people were making more money than they were back home, and that’s one reason they moved. Fed up with the corrupt and incompetent leadership back home, they moved. This Arab Diaspora provided a refuge for Islamic militants. Another benefit was the appearance of Arab language satellite news services in the 1990s. Terrorist movements thrived on publicity, and the more news channels there were out there, the more attention terrorist attacks would get.

All that terrorism is a sign that some Arabs are very unhappy. For decades, the powers-that-be refused to acknowledge why the kids were pissed off. Thanks to all those suicide bombs and breathless news reports, the family secret was out there for the entire world to see. No, not the al Qaeda “the West is making war on Islam,” canard, but an earlier al Qaeda call to overthrow the corrupt leaders of the Arab countries. Al Qaeda has to come up with the “war on Islam” angle to justify September 11, 2001, and earlier attacks. But the root cause is bad leadership at home.

So when the king of Saudi Arabia tells the assembled Arab leadership that they are the problem, you can take that as a sign of progress. But real progress it ain’t. Arab leaders are victims of their own success. Their rule is based on corruption and police state tactics. Think East Europe before 1989. Big difference is that, although the populations of East Europe then, and the Arab world now, were both fed up with their leaders and governments, the Arabs are not willing to make as painless a switch as the East Europeans did in the 1990s. That’s because the East Europeans had two choices; communism or democracy. The Arabs have three; despotism, democracy or Islamic dictatorship.

In Iraq we see how the Islamic radicals react to democracy. They call it un-Islamic and kill those who disagree with them. The Arabs have to deal with this, and in Iraq they are. But the violence in Iraq has revealed another Arab problem. Even if you remove religion from the equation, not all Arabs are keen on democracy. In Iraq, the Sunni Arab minority believe it is their right (or responsibility) to run the country. This is a common pattern in Arab countries. One minority believes they are rulers by right, and that democracy is an abomination and un-Islamic (or at least inconvenient for the ruling minority). This is the pattern in nearly every Arab country.

But there is hope. One of the least known members of the Arab League, Mauritania, held elections three years ago and now have the only other, besides Iraq, freely elected democratic government. The divisions in Mauritania, with a population of less than four million, are between the Arab (about a third) and “former slaves” (black Africans from the south). Mauritania exists on the border between Arabs and Bantu (the ethnic group that predominates in Africa south of the Sahara). Blacks were the slaves, and slavery was formerly abolished only in 1981. But slavery still exists in Mauritania, but so does democracy. Like South Africa, and a lot of other places where “democracy won’t work,” it does. Not democracy like in the United States, or Europe, or anywhere else. Every democracy is different, just like every culture is different. Democracy is a messy, inefficient form of government, but compared to all the others, it tends to be preferred by most people.

Arabs, even Arab leaders, know they need democracy. They have tried everything else, and nothing else works. But democracy is strong medicine for the current Arab leadership, and many would rather just talk about it, and go no further. And that is the problem in the Arab world. Islamic terrorism is the result.